IEEE Life Sciences Newsletter

HIMSS15: The Latest and Greatest in Healthcare IT on Display in Chicago

From 12-16 April, approximately 40,000 people converged at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, for the 2015 HIMSS Annual Conference—the largest health IT event in the industry. Keynote speakers and industry booths brought attendees together to view the latest in healthcare IT and debate topics ranging from mobile health to device standardization.

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Interoperability an Essential Component for Disaster Medicine

Interoperability an Essential Component for Disaster Medicine

One among many important focus areas at HIMSS15 was "disaster preparedness" – encompassing systems stability and communication network viability during regional disasters as well as ways to prepare for and address crises such as the Ebola virus outbreak in healthcare facilities.

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All-in-One: Multipurpose Healthcare Tool Takes Us Into the Future

by Cynthia Weber

The US$10 million Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, sponsored by the Qualcomm Foundation, hopes to bring healthcare's future to the palm of our hands. With the Star Trek tricorder serving as the ideal model, this global competition has inspired teams to create affordable, portable, hand-held wireless devices that offer reliable diagnoses of at least 15 diseases and health conditions as well as real-time monitoring of health status. Launched in January 2012, ten finalist teams for the competition were selected in August 2014, and the final award ceremony is scheduled for January 2016—the 50th anniversary of the popular Star Trek television series.

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Assistive Wearable Robotics: Healthcare’s New Clothes

by Denis Huen, Jindong Liu, and Benny Lo

Inspired by exoskeleton animals, a new form of robotics—wearable robots—have recently been introduced and attracted much attention with applications that range from enabling patients with paraplegia to walk to introducing superhuman capabilities. There are mainly two types of wearable robots: exoskeletons and soft exosuits, where the primary difference is the material used for the structure of the robot. In general, wearable robots are designed for enhancing the user's physical performance, such as strength, or to restore locomotion. This article reviews the field of wearable robotics, its development, applications, and current research trends.

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About the Newsletter

The IEEE Life Sciences Newsletter is a new initiative to bring forth interesting articles and informative interviews within the exciting field of life sciences every month. Please subscribe to the newsletter to receive notification each month when new articles are published.

Editor-in-Chief

Michael R. NeumanMichael R. Neuman is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University. His research interests are Biomedical sensors and instrumentation, Physiological measurements and perinatal medicine, Clinical applications of biomedical instrumentation, and Microfabrication technology.
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May 2015 Contributors

Denis HuenDenis Huen is an M.Res. candidate in Medical Robotics and Image Guided Intervention at the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Imperial College London. He is interested in fields related to nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and biologically inspired robotics. Currently, his research focuses mainly on assistive wearable robotics for healthcare applications. Read more

Jindong LiuJindong Liu is a research fellow at the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Imperial College London. He is interested in fields related to biologically inspired mobile robotics. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Essex where he built a biologically inspired autonomous robotic fish. Between 2008-2010, he studied the computational human auditory system and developed a computational mammalian auditory system applied to the sound localization on mobile robotics at University of Sunderland. In 2010, he joined the Hamlyn Centre, Imperial College London. Now he is focusing on natural human-robot speech interaction, pervasive sensing, and medical robots. Read more

Benny Ping Lai LoBenny Ping Lai Lo is Lecturer at the Hamlyn Centre and the Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London. Dr. Lo received his PhD in Computing from Imperial College London. His research interests include body sensor networks, pervasive computing, microelectronics, Bayesian networks, computer vision, temporal tracking, machine learning, image segmentation, and wearable robotics. Read more